Underground railroad writing activity for second

A worker on the Underground Railroad, Tubman made 13 trips to the South, helping to free over 70 people. On each side, have students brainstorm reasons for and against going to war in What are the risks with either choice? Slavery in Upper Canada now Ontario was outlawed in ; inJohn Robinsonthe Attorney General of Upper Canada, declared that by residing in Canada, black residents were set free, and that Canadian courts would [38] protect their freedom.

The Underground Railroad

Then ask students to imagine they could talk to that abolitionist today, and write a mock interview with him or her. What would they most like to ask him or her? It stipulated a more stringent Fugitive Slave Law ; ostensibly, the compromise addressed regional problems by compelling officials of free states to assist slave catchers, granting them immunity to operate in free states.

Using biblical references, fugitives referred to Canada as the " Promised Land " or "Heaven" and the Ohio River as the " River Jordan ", which marked the boundary between slave states and free states. Why did he feel "like a spy" traveling across Ohio?

Where were the Union, Confederate, and Border states? People who helped slaves find the railroad were "agents" or "shepherds" Guides were known as "conductors" Hiding places were "stations" or "way stations" "Station masters" hid slaves in their homes Escaped slaves were referred to as "passengers" or "cargo" Slaves would obtain a "ticket" Similar to common gospel lore, the "wheels would keep on turning" Financial benefactors of the Railroad were known as "stockholders" [29] The Big Dipper whose "bowl" points to the North Star was known as the drinkin' gourd.

Explore the Scene Have students find the clickable objects and people to learn about life in a northern city. They eventually escaped either to the North or to Canada, where slavery had been abolished during the s. Tell the Story As a culminating project, have students write personal narratives as if they are ex-slaves who escaped on the Underground Railroad.

What was his biggest fear? Then students will complete the coded letter using some of the secret language of the Underground Railroad. Ask students to imagine themselves living in that region of the country in Write a Secret Letter In this activity, students will learn about some common words and phrases used on the Underground Railroad.

Review and closing Divide students into partnerships. Ask them to imagine they are ex-slaves who made it safely to a northern city. Describe the differences between the economies of the North and the South. Observe student conversations as they discuss.

The Underground Railroad

Encourage them to answer some or all of the questions before moving on to the next stop. While some later returned to Canada, many remained in the United States. Why were newspapers important to the abolitionists?

Get on Board with Harriet Tubman

As a class, discuss the many roles that abolitionists played for one common cause — to end slavery. Do you think fugitives felt welcome in northern cities? Finally, as a class, decide which 19th century American abolitionist you would choose if you could meet one today.

Introduction 10 minutes Ask students what they know about life in the s or slavery during those times.

Underground Railroad

Estimates vary widely, but at least 30, slaves, and potentially more thanescaped to Canada via the Underground Railroad. According to Still, messages were often encoded so that they could be understood only by those active in the railroad.

The resulting economic impact was minuscule, but the psychological influence on slave holders was immense. If students want to learn more, encourage them to read "Slave Stories," actual interviews with slaves conducted in the s as part of the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration WPA.

It could mean freedom, but it also means leaving your family behind. Circulate and observe students speaking to their partners. Shortly, they will record their responses in a written format. For example, " Song of the Free ", written in about a man fleeing slavery in Tennessee by escaping to Canada, was composed to the tune of " Oh!

Rumors are swirling that fugitives from Kentucky will be crossing this evening. They rested, and then a message was sent to the next station to let the station master know the runaways were on their way. Explain to students that this quick activity is called Speak Up.

He later published these accounts in the book The Underground Railroad: Congress was dominated by southern Congressmen, as apportionment was based on three-fifths of the number of slaves being counted in population totals. How is the city different from the southern plantation from which you escaped?Primary Resource: His Promised Land: The Autobiography of John P.

Parker, Former Slave and Conductor on the Underground Railroad Lesson Length: 1. Using the Online Activity in Your Classroom.

Here are suggestions for how to use the various resources with your students. 1. Fact or Fiction. Read aloud the following statements about. Reading: Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky (1st/2nd grade) (MS Word document) 2nd; Social Studies and Language Arts Underground Railroad Book Activity (MS Word document) Underground Railroad Direction Sheet (MS Word document) Underground Railroad.

Description of lesson/activity: 1. Discuss the Underground Railroad. 2. Have students look up definitions for the words on Crossword Puzzle worksheet. Underground Railroad, and will increase their understanding of the concept of a “hero.” Have students respond in writing to the following question: If you were enslaved during the.

Description of lesson/activity: 1. Discuss the Underground Railroad. 2. Have students look up definitions for the words on Crossword Puzzle worksheet. Underground Railroad, and will increase their understanding of the concept of a “hero.” Have students respond in writing to the following question: If you were enslaved during the.

The Underground Railroad was a group of volunteers that helped slaves in the South before the Civil War. The slaves escaped to freedom in the North, the West and even to Canada or Mexico.

The volunteers were white and black, free and enslaved. In this activity, students read facts about the.

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Underground railroad writing activity for second
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